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Month Index: October, 1994


From:     Pascal Gaudette <rascal@???.org>
Date:     Tue, 11 Oct 1994 17:20:58 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:  Re: MF, eyespace[D
> Joe "I just ran a mile" Delisle wrote:
>
> > Also, there's a problem with
> > using two black holes (I think): space is black, and black holes are
> > black (due to total light absorption and no radiating of light), so
> > how do you see them?
>

[I missed the beginning of this thread, so I hope this is relevant...]

BHs also act as gravitational lenses for light that comes within
their vicinity (sp?). It is quite possible a thorough navigator
would notice distortions in background stellar positions
before an actual collision occurs. (In the case of a star being
exactly behind the BH, you could even see a "ring" of light
around the BH.)

It is also possible that the BH be surrounded by some form of
accretion disk, which, if large enough, could be seen. In fact,
this is probably pretty common in the Real World. (Or the BH could
be in a binary system.)

Anyway, a BH *should* be a very dangerous, hard to spot, and very
lethal threat.

--
Pascal "The Rascal" Gaudette
rascal@???.org / rascal@???????.??.??????.ca


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